In a new, ongoing trial, deep-brain stimulation – more commonly used for Parkinson’s patients – is being tested on patients after a stroke. Doctors are hoping that the process, which involves implanting an electrode that stimulates a particular area of the patient’s brain after a stroke, will reverse the patient’s paralysis post-stroke and restore mobility.

To comprehend how a stroke hinders normal brain function, Laurie Ann Bonkoski, a speech therapist, compares a stroke to a home whose front door has unexpectedly become blocked by a fallen tree. In her studies, she’s determined to evade that blockage and access different paths to help recover as much functionality to the person as possible.

To work in conjunction with therapy to develop new neural pathways, Dr. Andre Machado of the Cleveland Clinic implanted the first deep-brain stimulating electrode into a stroke patient as the initial first step in this clinical human trial. The next step will be to switch it on, transmitting the electrical impulses that he hopes will stimulate brain growth. Based on the outcomes of this trial, several other conditions are lined up for similar tests. University Hospital neurosurgeon Jennifer Sweet shares, “People are studying the benefit of this for addiction; we know that it can be effective in obsessive compulsive disorder, it’s been used to treat Tourette’s; it may even be an option for anorexia or obesity or hypertension.”

Atlanta Home Care Partners will be watching for developments in this study. In the meantime, if your senior loved one requires assistance after a stroke, call us at 404.228.0103 or contact us online for in-home personal care Atlanta services to improve his or her life quality. We are able to help in any of the following ways:

  • Preparing nourishing meals in accordance with any prescribed dietary plan
  • Helping with light household chores and laundry
  • Performing a safety evaluation of the home to reduce fall risks
  • Providing escorted transportation to medical appointments or other outings
  • Picking up prescriptions and running errands
  • And much, much more